Exhibitions

Below is a selected list of the temporary and travelling exhibitions I have led. As with all my environmental design, I attempt to provide a full, trans and mixed-media storytelling experience. My interpretive and design approaches focus on 5 key objectives that have become signatures of my exhibition development:

1- creating a balance between passive, active, and interactive experiences
2- applying a strict inclusive design methodology
3- applying trans and mixed-media storytelling
4- providing opportunities for visitor expression, collaboration, and personalization
5- extending the reach of the experience (beyond in-situ to remote audiences, and a post-visit continued engagement)


Rights of Passage: Canada at 150

2017-12-10 – TBD
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Original Production
Mixed media, artefact, scenography and digital immersion, 140 m2 (1500 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority, Film Producer
Link

My direction with this exhibition was to present 150 years of human rights history through an immersive environmental design that would focus on the material and medium reflective of the eras of stories being presented – letterpress/printing press and wood, steel and radio, plastic and television, and finally light (where medium and material have become one and the same).

This design direction proved a great fit to also push the in-situ experience through tangible/natural interfaces. This further immerses visitors in the material and media of the time, and encourages a greater engagement with the exhibition’s content. The tangible interfaces of a newspaper page, radio knobs (recreating an era-specific radio using an iPad interface with tangible knobs), TV sets from the 70s and 80s (rear projection, Mac Mini run program, synchronized video across 3 TVs, tangible knobs), and finally spots of light with projected hashtags that when intersected by the visitor create a natural interface through body position within 3D space, and finally the visitor’s own voice acts as a natural interface.

As the knobs on the radio and tv tune to channels, in the Facing the Future zone of the exhibition, stepping into the projected hashtag causes the entire environment to respond (lighting, projections, music, Apple and Google watches, an Arduino-controlled and integrated dress, and 3D holographic virtualized objects). In the Defending Sovereignty zone the most natural interface, voice/sound, causes the environment and content to change.


Sight Unseen
2016-02-20 – 2016-09-18
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Loaned from Curatorial Assistance Travelling Exhibitions, adapted and supplement
2D Print + 3D tactile and participatory experiences, 465 m2 (5000 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

The Sight Unseen exhibition interested me for it’s incredible challenge to visitors as to what preconceived opinions towards “perception” might be – a photography show where the work was created by photographers who are blind. Not only did I love how we might interpret this within a human rights context, I was equally excited by the exhibition design potential. My direction was not only to further push the inclusion and accessibility of this show, but also to push how we would take a passive exhibition (2D artwork) and make it both active and interactive as well.

Partnering with 3DPhotoworks we created tactile, audio described 3D representations of several of the photos. This made the photos accessible to people who couldn’t see them, but more than that, made the experience multi-sensory. This allowed visitors to see the images with their eyes, their ears, and/or their hands.

The addition of a voice over photo challenge saw visitors use iPod Touch devices with the screens turned off, take photos using the accessibility features inherent to the device. The resulting images were hashtagged and posted to Instagram, and aggregated into a Tumblr page. This page was then projected in gallery, within the context of the exhibition, therefore democratizing the content presentation of a fine art exhibition.

Another participative installation allowed visitors to recreate the methodology of one of the artists by tracing photos with special pens, passing the creations through a heater which then raises the ink and creates tactile line drawings of the original material.

The overall result was an extremely inclusive and accessible fine art exhibition, that included multisensory “photography”, and2 informative and educational interactive installations, and an exhibition that extended it’s participative and passive reaches to remote audiences.

> PLAY VIDEO


The Witness Blanket
2015-12-15 – 2016-06-26
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Private loan included in originally produced exhibition
Mixed media, 140 m2 (1500 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

The first time I saw Carey Newman’s Witness Blanket, I was struck by its power. Bringing it to the Canadian Museum for Human Rights was an extremely meaningful experience for me. My approach to presenting the Witness Blanket was to round out the experience design. The Witness Blanket’s power is observed and felt, just by being in its presence. My concept was to allow for more than a passive, in-gallery experience, and yet do something that did not compete, but rather complemented, or added to, the power of this experience.

My direction was to provide an opportunity for visitor response to the Witness Blanket, and to extend the didactic context of the installation. The Reflection Wall was projected in-gallery and presented online. Submissions to the wall were possible from the in-gallery installation and via web/mobile input. As such, the remote and on-site audiences were equally participating in the dialogue of the residential school system, and the dialogue itself was taking place in blended space – both online and in-situ. Visitors were able to reflect upon the power of their experience with such an important artefact and thus the overall experience had both passive and interactive facets, increasing personalization and engagement.


Points of View, A National Human Rights Photography Exhibition
2017-06-23 – 2018-02-04
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Original Production
2D Photo prints + 3D tactile images, 465 m2 (5000 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority, Film Producer
Link

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights being a new museum, with an intangible subject matter has very little in the way of permanent collections. As such, I had multiple concurrent primary goals when initiating this project. I wanted to celebrate Canada’s 150th anniversary through a crowd sourced initiative – thereby engaging the national population in a participative and collaborative manner, and concurrently building the CMHR’s collection, thereby facilitating operations into the future. The new museum is collection building and as such spends many resources on researching, licensing and acquiring media assets/digital artefacts. As such, this exhibition was juried and of the nearly 1000 submission, 70 were selected for exhibition and immediately became part of Canada’s national collection.

The exhibition engaged a national audience in participation (over 1000 submissions received), captured dialogue of the time (varying interpretations and reflections on human rights from a diverse national population), provided substantial material for digital outreach through social channels, had strong stakeholder and community engagement (those who were participating), and helped build the museum’s collection, thereby mitigating research, licensing, and productions efforts into the future. This was also an opportunity to iterate upon the 3D tactile and audio described photo work first used in the Sight Unseen Exhibition. Taking what had been learned, and producing improved versions of the tactile, audio described 3D photos.

> PLAY VIDEO


Points Of View (Nano)
2017-11-14 – 2017-11-19: Marda Loop (Calgary, Alberta)
2017-11-27 – 2017-12-17: Calgary Public Library (Calgary, Alberta)
Original Production
2D Photo prints + 3D tactile images, 10m2 (100 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

Seeking Refuge
2017-08-22 – 2018-08
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Private loan
Artefact/Object and video documentary, 10m2 (100 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority, Film Producer
Link

Our Canada, My Story  (Abridged)
2017-07-03 – 2017-09-30: International Peace Gardens (Manitoba/North Dakota)
Original Production
Video portraits, 140 m2 (1500 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority, Film Producer
Link

Our Canada, My Story
2017-02-28 – 2017-09-17
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Original Production
Video portraits, 140 m2 (1500 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority, Film Producer
Link

A Perilous Crossing
2016-05-10 – 2017-05-21
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Loaned from Pier 21 and Canadian Museum of Immigration
Artefacts and video, 10m2 (100 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

1867 Rebellion and Confederation
2016-12-13 – 2017-05-07
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Loaned from Canadian Museum of History and adapted with original content
Artefacts and ambient effects, 465 m2 (5000 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

Girl of Courage
2016-07-04 – 2017-03-19
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Private loan, 10m2 (100 ft2)
Artefacts and video
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

Empowering Women
2016-07-23 – 2017-01-08
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Loaned from International Folk Art Museum supplemented with originally produced digital media
Artefact heavy, 140 m2 (1500 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

Weaving a Better Future
Original Production
Artefacts, digital installation,15 m2 (150 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority, Film Producer
2017-06-05: Senate of Canada
2017-06-06 – 2017-06-23: University of Ottawa (Ottawa)
2017-07-03 – 2017-07-11: Museo Ixchel, Guatemala (Guatemala)
2017-07-14 – 2017-07-23: Museo Miraflores, Guatemala (Guatemala)

Let Them Howl
2016-03-08 – 2016-03-30
Fort Gibraltar (Winnipeg) & Rideau Canal (Ottawa)
Original production in partnership with Library and Archives Canada
2D Print, Outdoor Exhibition (+ web game component)
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

XOXO: An Exhibit About Love and Forgiveness
2015-10-04 – 2016-01-03
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Loaned from Pittsburgh Children’s Museum and adapted
Youth experience, participatory interactive exhibition
Role: Project Director/Authority
Link

Magna Carta – Law, Liberty, Legacy + Canada’s Magna Carta: Meanings and Misconceptions
2015-08-15 – 2015-09-18
Canadian Museum for Human Rights
Partially loaned from Magna Carta Canada, partially an originally produced exhibition
Mixed media, 465 m2 (5000 ft2)
Role: Project Director/Authority, Film Producer
Link